Clients

Clients

ClientsWe’ve helped hundreds of socially responsible businesses and organizations develop innovative capital raise strategies spanning private raises, direct public offerings, Regulation Crowdfunding, Regulation A offerings and more. Beyond capital raise...
Insights From Innovators

Insights From Innovators

Insights from Innovators Over the years, we’ve had clients from across the US complete a wide variety of capital raises. We followed up with a few of them to hear about their experiences and the advice they would offer other businesses considering a public...
A Mission Driven Pickling Company Reached Their Direct Public Offering Goal in Less Than Two Months, This Is Where They Are Now

A Mission Driven Pickling Company Reached Their Direct Public Offering Goal in Less Than Two Months, This Is Where They Are Now

Seventeen years ago a small pickling company called Real Pickles, based in Greenfield, Massachusetts, became dedicated to changing the food system. Owners Addie Rose Holland and Dan Rosenberg practice traditional fermentation using only produce sourced from local family farms. Their pickles are a representation of how they operate their mission driven business — with meticulous care.

Part of Real Pickles’ vision to change the food system included transitioning their business into a worker-owner co-operative to actively support their workers and demonstrate a working model for other food businesses to follow.

Twelve years after Real Pickles was founded, Addie and Dan began the process to worker-owned co-operative by evaluating capital raising strategies to successfully make the transition. They chose a direct public offering (DPO) strategy (that Cutting Edge Capital structured and advised on), finding that a community capital raise aligned with their mission to build up community.

After five years of settling into the success of their direct public offering, Real Pickles co-owner Addie Rose shared with us where they are now and how they got there.

What is Real Pickles? 
Real Pickles is a worker-owned co-operative on a mission to build a better food system. We make traditionally fermented pickles, sauerkraut, kimchi and other vegetables that are nourishing and rich in probiotics. We source all of our vegetables from family farms in the Northeast and sell our products only within the Northeast region.

When did you begin your first raise?
We started our first direct public offering (DPO) community capital raise in the spring of 2013. The purpose of the raise was to finance our transition to a worker co-operative.

What was your goal amount and how long did it take to reach it?
Our goal was $500,000.00 and we reached it in less than 2 months!

How did you network and market to raise capital? 
We started planning our networking and marketing efforts several months before the offering was approved for release. We attended many events to maintain a high awareness of our brand, and practiced a carefully-crafted message. Connections with like-minded partner organizations, including our regional Slow Money chapters and other businesses with investor connections were important for spreading the word. After twelve years in business, Real Pickles enjoyed strong community support, and we were able to leverage our years of networking and marketing to reach out to our community for this raise. See this resource for more information on our process.

What was challenging about the direct public offering process?
Initially, we were expecting to work with a local attorney that could support us through the legal process of setting up a DPO. After many discussions with local firms, it was clear that we’d need to work with someone who had specialized knowledge of the securities regulations and process, as well as the interest in working with a small business (with limited resources). We were introduced to Cutting Edge Capital and found our match!

What was your favorite aspect about the DPO process?
It was heartening to see how excited people in our community were to invest locally. Many people in our area are committed to local eating and shopping, but there aren’t many opportunities for local investing. The popularity of our raise demonstrated that there is an appetite for this kind of community investment opportunity!

What are the longstanding results of the capital raise? And what have those results allowed Real Pickles to accomplish?
Our capital raise allowed Real Pickles to transition to a worker-owned co-operative, with all of the anticipated benefits to our employees and our larger community (see here, here, and here). In addition, we gained a fantastic group of community investors, many of whom were longtime customers or suppliers, who as investors are now even more committed to our business and our mission!

Discuss the expansion of your team and the growth of your business.
Since our transition to a co-operative, we have doubled the number of worker-owners on our team (from the founding five worker-owners) and our business has continued steady growth. The new energy and ideas that new owners bring is welcomed by everyone. We feel that our business is stronger than ever, and that our team is well-prepared to guide our business into the future.  

Back row, L to R: Kristin Howard, Tamara McKerchie, Heather Wernimont, Andy Van Assche, Brendan Flannelly-King. Front row, L to R: Annie Winkler, Addie Rose Holland, Lucy Kahn, Katie Korby, Dan Rosenberg.

Why did you choose the cooperative structure?
The purpose of our conversion was to demonstrate an alternative model for a growing natural foods business that keeps ownership local, supports our employees, and protects our strong social mission into the future (see here).  

Have you noticed more interest or response to direct public offerings in general in your own community after Real Pickles’ success with a DPO?
There has been a lot of interest in community capital raising since our DPO. In fact, our neighbor Artisan Beverage Co-operative made a similar raise within a couple of years after ours – as well as CERO in Boston. Many other business owners have reached out to discuss possibilities. It is great to see that this method of community investment is gaining momentum.

Share three key pieces of advice you have for business owners looking to go the direct public offering route. 

  1. Partner with your community to build a strong network and campaign. Make sure you are tapping into any existing “buy local” or Slow Money organizations.
  2. Take time to prepare before your raise. Be sure to craft your messages carefully and have your materials ready to go, so that you can focus on needed networking and communication with investors.
  3. Carefully consider the minimum share price to make it accessible (the most exciting part of a DPO!!) and yet maintain your investor pool at a manageable size (we ended up with 77 investors, which feels just right for us!).

What are you most excited about for the future of Real Pickles?
I’m excited for more and more workers to become owners at Real Pickles, and I love to see our workers practicing the art of ownership. Our business is in good hands for a future of smart growth, meaningful jobs, and partnering with our community to build a better food system!

If you’re interested in direct public offerings or transitioning your business into a worker-owned co-operative, fill out our contact form here or email us at info@cuttingedgecapital.com.

It’s the DPO Digest!

It’s the DPO Digest!

Baah baah almost there!

baahThe Economic Development and Financing Corporation is at 90% of its goal in its Direct Public Offering. California investors can help them reach their target by investing before February 9th.

Through a community-based Local Social Impact Investment Note, EDFC offers investors an opportunity for California residents to launch the Mendocino Wool Mill project – and shift their money from Wall Street to “Main Street.”

Learn more here.

Mission: Cheese.

mc tickerSan Francisco’s Mission Cheese is almost halfway to their goal of opening their new restaurant, Makers Common. With some of the most creative marketing out there, they literally put the investment opportunity on the menu with a  $1,000 “founders special.”

In the words of one of their investors:

“I couldn’t pass up the opportunity to support local makers. By supporting Maker’s Common you’re also supporting all the small food producers they source from. Maker’s Common has created an opportunity for me to invest in my local community, and that’s an opportunity that doesn’t come by very often.”  – Buck Lucas, SF, CA

Want to learn more? Mission cheese is hosting a Happy Hour for potential investors on February 8th @ 6:30 p.m. RSVP directly on their website.

Blazing the Trail

mt logoMy Trail was born in Boulder, Colorado, out of a passion for the outdoors and a desire to bring to market the very best lightweight and functional outdoor clothing and equipment. T heir merchandise will be available on their website, and they eventually plan to open retail locations in Colorado.
After completing the DPO Lab (then known as the “DPO Boot Camp”), My Trail Company has raised $294,100 of its $800,000 goal, with 150 days to go! The 1st $200,000 they brought in funded production of their best-selling styles, an e-commerce launch, the opening of a new distribution center, and the hiring of core staff.

In their offering, investors purchase preferred shares directly from the company, earning 10% annual dividends, which will either be paid in cash or accrue from year to year and be paid upon a liquidation or certain types of redemption. Investors will receive a 20% discount on product purchases.

Investors in Colorado can find more about the opportunity on Cutting Edge X, the Direct Offering Marketplace. Learn more about My Trail.

Composting Pays

cero pictureFounded in 2012, CERO Cooperative is more than just a compost hauler in Massachusetts. They are built on the mission of improving their communities while doing right by the environment. Plus, as a worker-owned cooperative all their employees are deeply vested in their success. Turns out, their community is too!  Unique as a bilingual, multicultural co-op, CERO completed a year long  Direct Public Offering , raising capital by selling shares of dividend-paying stock to regular community people. Lenders who were initially hesitant to take a chance on lower income entrepreneurs in the green economy are now on board, and CERO is growing, providing the jobs it promised to workers who own the company. In one year, they raised over $350,000 from their community using our Online Investment Tool and CuttingEdgeX listing site. You can learn more about their story and growth in a short video on their website.

Investing in the Silver City

murray pictureA graduate of our DPO Lab, (formerly known as “DPO Boot Camp”) the  Murray Hotel has received regulatory approval to conduct a DPO in New Mexico. In the heart of Silver City, the Murray Hotel is a 1938 Art Deco hotel that celebrated the 75th anniversary of its original opening in 2013. The Murray Hotel is raising $600,000 by selling membership interests in the business through a DPO. Investors may earn up to 5% return per year. The funds raised in its DPO will be used for renovations of the hotel, including guest rooms and food facilities, and for marketing the hotel and its proximate location to amazing wilderness and cultural areas. On January 21, 2016, they held their first meeting with potential investors. Read more about the Murray Hotel in this article. Stay tuned for updates on their offering!